Anderson Banking Big Bucks at Baptist

Chris Anderson’s benefit package as CEO of Mississippi Baptist Health Systems could be in the neighborhood of $750,000. While specifics are unavailable for 2014, IRS filings show that the previous CEOs of Baptist earned between $700,000 and $800,000 annually.

 

Mark Slyter $707,251 total compensation  Sep 2012 – August 2013

 

Kurt Metzner $809,541 total compensation  Sep 2011 – August 2012

 

Mea Culpa – Correction & Clarification

 

We extend our apologies to SRHS trustee Scott Taylor for writing that he had any knowledge of, or participation in, any actions related to MAN. He has only been on the board since February and our reporting unfairly lumped him in with the monolithic SRHS governance. By all reports Mr. Taylor has been doing great work to assist the retirees and understand the problems.  SRHS Watch has a lot of respect of and confidence in Mr. Taylor.

We rely upon Mr. Taylor’s word that the board has had no participation in or knowledge of any MAN related activities during his tenure.

We correct our original reporting which suggested that the current board is participating in, or approving payments to MAN.

Mr. Taylor confirmed the majority of our original reporting:

  1. SRHS, led by Kevin Holland, joined an entity formed by Anderson after his departure
  2. Holland attended meetings of MAN, likely also attended by Anderson
  3. SRHS sent money to MAN.  This would have required knowledge and approval from CEO, CFO, and should have been listed on the docket of claims presented to the board.
  4. For six months SRHS didn’t find any reason to distance itself from Anderson.

One commenter provided granular detail on these payments: $1,500 each quarter. There is some conflict between those figures provided by an insider and those reported by Mr. Taylor. We trust he will investigate and reply. Hopefully Singing River leadership will allow the release of a ledger report showing all transactions involving MAN.

Our readership should be assured that every attempt is made to verify the accuracy of posted information. “Unsubstantiated rumor” is never relied upon. We owe a large debt of gratitude to those who contribute their knowledge in support of truth and reform, especially the SRHS insiders, current and former.

SRHS Watch is about exposing issues and bringing about discussion. The day that Singing River holds open board meetings, publishes minutes without mass redaction, reforms internal governance, and cuts ties to cronies and instead installs other competent and disinterested parties is the day there will be nothing left to write about.

 

 

Comment Bump: SRHS Trustee Scott Taylor on MAN

Editor’s Note: SRHS Watch published a story this week detailing the activities of SRHS, Chris Anderson, and the Mississippi Affiliated Network Singing River Trustee Scott Taylor disputes our timeline. As the citizen owners of Singing River do not enjoy the unfettered access to board minutes that Mr. Taylor does, we rely upon his past frankness and credibility in dealing with these issues. Any necessary corrections, updates, and responses will be published tomorrow. Mr. Taylor writes:

I was appointed to the SRHS BOT in February 2015. Your post was the first time I heard of MAN. When I read it I started asking questions. What I have found out is that MAN was started as something of a lobbying group consisting of nine non-profit hospital systems across the state. I do not know what it turned into or what its function is now. Though MAN was incorporated on May 20, 2014, Chris Anderson started it long before his departure from SRHS, though I am not sure exactly when.

Because SRHS was a member at the time, Kevin Holland attended some meetings of MAN between March 2014, when he was appointed CEO, and September 2014, when SRHS ended any and all involvement with it. In September 2014 SRHS contributed $1000 to MAN, just before we pulled out. One reason that SRHS pulled out was that it was thought not to be in the best interest of the system to be involved in any organization headed by Chris Anderson. So if you have something other than unsubstantiated rumor to support your statement that any of our executives have any involvement with Anderson, I would love to hear it. From what I have been able to find out, nothing could be farther from the truth. We also got out of MAN because all attention needed to be on our struggling system. It did not make sense to expend time, energy or other resources on anything else, including lobbying organizations.

Your statement that we have been sending money to MAN for months is not accurate. Your statement that this was done with full knowledge of Holland, Bond and the BOT is not accurate. With the exception of one payment in the amount of $1000 a year ago, it did not happen. I never even heard of MAN until today. SRHS has no ties to Chris Anderson. Your statements to the contrary are not accurate. I ask that you correct these inaccurate statements.

I have done all that I can do to make sure that what I am telling you is correct. If you have information that proves that I am wrong about any of it I urge you to share it with me. Public dissemination of information, should at least, come with the obligation to make sure that the information disseminated is accurate. If, in the future, you care to contact me I will be happy to assist in checking the factual accuracy of anything that you wish to report. I have been, and will continue to be, more than willing to answer any question that you, or anybody else has, if I can.

Scott

 

 

Chris Anderson MANs up, Still in Bed with SRHS C-Suiters, Board

Billy Guice has remarked that if someone in Singing River administration would have “manned up” a few years ago, the entire pension crisis could have been avoided.  Just a few short months following his exit at SRHS, Chris Anderson did MAN up and executives and Singing River climbed right into bed with him.

In this case, MAN stands for Mississippi Affiliated Network, LLC.  The group was formed with Chris Anderson as president and Evan Dillard of Forrest General as secretary.  MAN is attempting to create a network of hospitals to work outside of networks controlled by the Blue Crosses and United Healthcares of the world.

SRHS Sends Funds to Anderson, MAN

For several months Singing River has been sending funds to MAN. This is with the full knowledge and approval of CEO Kevin Holland, CFO Lee Bond, and the Board of Trustees. Continue reading

Familiar Names Host Hurst Fundraiser

Former Assistant US Attorney Mike Hurst is planning a campaign event in Jackson County and you’re invited – if you can cough up the dough.

Hurst is running on a platform of rooting out public corruption. Geoff Pender reports in today’s Clarion Ledger:

“I’m hopeful because the FBI has as its No. 1 priority in the nation for criminal investigations is to go after public corruption,” Hurst said. “If it’s the No. 1 priority for the FBI, I think it’s good enough for the attorney general’s office. There’s going to be a change in that office, and it’s going to make public corruption a No. 1 priority.”

Public corruption is priority numero uno and in that effort Hurst’s campaign is enlisting some odd bedfellows in Jackson County.

A friend sends in the below.  Continue reading

Sunday Morning Preview

SRHS Watch returns from hiatus with a preview of events that are unfolding.

Karen Nelson at The Sun Herald has an article out today explaining more about the corporate welfare the Board of Supervisors grants to the 12th largest corporation in the US, Chevron. Subsidies for Chevron, but not for the county’s poor in need of healthcare.

Other items to be covered:

  • Discovery has been stayed in SRHS cases
  • Singing River’s Budget
  • Review of 2013 pension plan audit
  • Chris Anderson MANs up, still in bed with SRHS execs
  • Retirees appeal to President Obama, look for more national and statewide attention
  • Statewide races and SRHS
  • The JCBOS in conjunction with the Pat Harrison waterway seek to dam(n) the Pascagoula to create a water park
  • Transparency and openness reforms that should be enacted by the county

Riding the Waves of Your 401(k), 403(b)

The balance of your 401(k) or 403(b) is falling lately, but should you be scared? This video gives some explanation.